Staff ratios must be priority

Staffing ratios per resident need to be addressed. I am an enrolled nurse in a residential facility and I have just had my job made redundant, along with another EN.

This now means only 1 EN to administer medication, treat wounds and assist health care workers, when needed, to every 30 residents. Continue reading

Litany of issues with aged care ratios

I have a long paper trail of issues dealing with residential aged care and the lack of staff. I have heard recently that the government is asking for ratios to be accounted for in facilities. It is a huge problem, especially in the aged care industry.

The facility that I am dealing with never seems to have enough staff. I am finding that, during the time I spend with my husband at the facility, I am left to do things for him that are the staff’s responsibility. Continue reading

Staff:resident ratios

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Fewer staff, bigger workloads, time for caring wiped out, sometimes with serious consequences.

There are claims that cuts to qualified staff led to the death of a Queensland woman from septicaemia just two months after her aged care facility failed 15 of 44 industry standards.

As an ABC Online report notes, the centre was found to be lacking in the level of food, fluids and personal care, with not enough “appropriately skilled and qualified staff” and insufficient monitoring and reporting of “clinical incidents”.

It two other reports in the Sunshine Coast Daily another Queensland aged care facility – with a previously unblemished record – that had cut 722 hours from its fortnightly staff roster last year subsequently failed eight of 44 industry standards.

The reported shortfalls, worryingly, were in medication management, clinical care and specialised nursing care needs.

Staff-to-resident ratios in both cases drew the wrath of residents, families and, in the latter case, the district’s federal member.

Conversation starter

Are you satisfied with level and quality of clinical or nursing care provided in your – or your loved one’s – aged care facility? Are there sufficient staff to provide a decent service? What needs to change? Have you been able to raise your concerns with anyone and, if so, what was the response? Did care improve afterwards?

Have your say on aged care-2

Staffing in residential aged care

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Stories abound of shrinking staff numbers in Australian residential aged care facilities. Fewer people to take on larger workloads and fewer shifts to go around. It is one of the most contentious aspects evident, right across the residential aged care system.

Sadly, evidently with the blessing of authorities, some providers have opted to reassign certain duties – that previously only a registered nurse could do – to the sector’s newest position, “personal care workers”.

Alarm bells are ringing because these less expensive workers, it is claimed, are being tasked with administering medicines “without proper training”.

Just what it was like working in that environment was explained at a recent aged care forum by a qualified nurse.

In this long read from the Bundaberg NewsMail, which describes her typical work day, this nurse outlines the shortcuts needed to meet productivity expectations as well as the reasons she no longer works in the sector.

Conversation starter

Are you a current or former aged care facility worker? What changes have you seen over the recent past in staffing levels and what has that meant for residents and staff? Did you leave the sector because of staffing level issues or are you considering doing so? Or have you or a loved one seen staffing level changes in your aged care facility?

Have your say on aged care-2